‘A tree on the moon at night’, 2020. Photo: Jens Ziehe

‘Rainbow ellipse progression’, 2020. Photo: Matthias Kolb

‘The weather project’, 2003, Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, London (The Unilever Series). Photo: Ari Magg

‘Solutions to climate change require long-term decisions, long-term investment, long-term planning. We need to see accountability by politicians, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 years into the future, long after the politician's dead and gone. We get a lot of science ... but it's fair to say that it's often very disembodied. It is knowledge that doesn't have a physical sort of storage; there's no memory of it in our bodies... One of the things that art can do – and it's not the only thing – is it can sort of bring a physical narrative to something that one knows. I think we have a better ability to translate our critical enquiry into action once we have a physical relationship with the world. Bringing an experiential narrative to knowledge ... gives you a certain empowerment. We have a situation now where the whole planet has become conscious about climate change. I think we see a trend how to translate our climate knowledge into climate actions. I hope it's the beginning we are seeing, and not the peak.’ – Olafur Eliasson in the CNN article ‘Olafur Eliasson on what art can do to fight climate change’, 2019

‘The glacier melt series 1999/2019' (detail), 2019, installed at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Visit this link to find out more about the artwork and its research context.